Overview | Centre for Science and Environment

Overview


About Workshop

Several media briefing workshops have been conducted by the unit till date. These workshops - national, South Asian as well as regional - have primarily aimed at demystifying key environmental issues for the benefit of the media, so that it gets a basic understanding of the subject. 

About Media Fellowships

MRC has successfully conducted ten media fellowship programmes for journalists – on water, desertification, forests, sustainable development and livelihoods in India’s North-east, mining and environment, National Rural Employment Guarantee Act, Rivers, coasts and indian cities under JNNURM. Last year also saw the first South Asian media fellowship on climate change, followed by the second South Asian Media fellowship on coastal concerns. These fellowships have primarily aimed at encouraging journalists to write on issues of development and environment.

About Media Resource Centre

The Media Resource Centre (MRC) dovetails its efforts with other CSE units to help disseminate information and establish a sustained and interactive contact with the mass media. The objective is to bring into sharp focus environmental and sustainability issues in national and international media and polity.

Green Schools Program

The Green Schools Programme is an ‘inspection’ or ‘survey’ of the school done by its students on its environmental practices (which we call environmental auditing). The students form teams and go around the school on an exploratory journey and find out what’s happening – to the water, energy, land , air and waste in the school. How is the school managing these issues?

About Environment Education

Environment education has for long been limited to a narrow focus on nature and wildlife, topics on which a vast amount of literature already exists. The Environment Education Unit (EEU) at CSE was launched to initiate ecological literacy.

Energy and Transport

Transport sector is the largest user of oil – nearly half of the total consumption, and is poised to make India’s oil security even more precarious. Asian Development Bank projects that the total fuel consumption of on-road vehicles in India in 2035 can be six times over that of 2005 level. Explosive growth in personal vehicles and steady shift of freight transport from railways to roadways will incite ravenous appetite for energy.

Climate and Transport

For the first time, Indian regulators are faced with this explicit connection – curb local air pollution to save lives, and at the same time, shrink carbon and energy imprints of vehicles to save fuels and the climate. But this synergy is the weakest link in our policies today. We are caught in serious trade-offs instead.

Vehicular technology and fuel quality: Why must India leapfrog?

Vehicles are a special problem as they emit in the breathing zone of people. A large number of studies are now available that show exposure to vehicle exhaust causes significant increase in respiratory symptoms and lung function impairment, cancer and plethora of other ailments.

About Air Pollution

What happened to our right to CLEAN AIR!
Our campaign started with blowing the lid on smog and exposing the smogmakers in a city where a person dies every hour due to air pollution. The campaign carries on to clean the air of noxious pollutants to make breathing easier for all.

Overview-Air quality & Public Health

The rate at which urban air pollution has grown across India is alarming. A vast majority of cities are caught in the toxic web as air quality fails to meet health-based standards. Almost all cities are reeling under severe particulate pollution while newer pollutants like oxides of nitrogen and air toxics have begun to add to the public health challenge. Only a few mega cities where action has started show some improvement in air quality but in most cases the particulate levels are still unacceptably high.

Follow us on 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
gobar times