Press Release | Centre for Science and Environment

Press Release


Jharkhand governor releases CSE’s study on mining

Ranchi, March 28, 2008

India’s richest lands – with minerals, forests, wildlife and water 

sources – are home to its poorest people. Mining in India has, contrary to government’s claims, done little for the development of the mineral-bearing regions of the country: says the latest publication from New Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) – its 356-page 6th State of India’s Environment Report, titled Rich Lands, Poor People -- Is Sustainable Mining Possible?

Governor Gopal Gandhi releases CSE’s latest study on mining, people and environment in Kolkata

India’s richest lands – with minerals, forests, wildlife and water sources – are home to its poorest people. Mining in India has, contrary to government’s claims, done little for the development of the mineral-bearing regions of the country: says the latest publication from New Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) -- its 356-page 6th State of India’s Environment. Report, titled Rich Lands, Poor People -- Is Sustainable Mining Possible?  

Tax our cars, Mr Finance Minister, not our buses: says CSE

New Delhi, January 16, 2008: The car is not the problem, but government policy is, says the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), listing its demands for Budget 2008. The 9th Auto Expo will close on January 17, but its message should make us all sit up. Personal vehicle ownership is rising in India; it will grow manifold in coming years. There will be a few million more cars -- small as well as big, and many of them driven on toxic diesel -- jostling for that limited space on our limited roads.

Orissa Governor releases CSE’s national report on mining and environment

India’s richest lands – with minerals, forests, wildlife, water sources – are home to its poorest people. Mining in India has, contrary to government’s claims, done little for the development of the mineral-bearing regions of the country: says the latest publication from New Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment -- its 356-page 6th State of India’s Environment Report, titled Rich Lands, Poor People -- Is Sustainable Mining Possible? 

The agenda for tiger conservation is urgent. The National Tiger Conservation Authority needs to set clear goals and take tough action, says CSE

New Delhi, November 27, 2006: “Setting up a National Tiger Conservation Authority was a key recommendation of the Tiger Task Force, and we welcome this step. The real test begins now: the Authority must have clear goals to be able to make a difference,” said Sunita Narain, director, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) at a press briefing here today. Narain had headed the Tiger Task Force set up by the prime minister in 2005 to investigate the tiger crisis and to suggest ways to safeguard the magnificent animal.

Cement industry ‘green’ only when it suits its pocket, says CSE rating study

New Delhi, December 16, 2005: The cement industry, the country’s second largest excise duty payer (after tobacco industry) and potentially very polluting, has been awarded the Three Leaves Award by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE). This sector, which has major environmental impacts, has received higher marks than the three sectors rated previously by CSE – pulp and paper, chlor-alkali and automobiles.

Tiger Task Force report presents agenda to save the tiger the Indian way

Recently submitted report says in India, forests are not wilderness but also the habitats of people

Tiger Task Force submits report to prime minister Manmohan Singh Presents an action agenda to save the tiger the Indian way, where forests are not wilderness but also the habitats of people

New Delhi, August 5, 2005: India is protecting its tigers against all odds; the biggest threat to the tiger today is not poaching per se, but a deadly combination of the poachers’ guns and the growing anger of people who live in and around tiger habitats, says Joining the Dots, the report of the Tiger Task Force submitted to prime minister Manmohan Singh today.

Where poison flows in the veins…

Chandigarh, June 7, 2005: A study by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a New Delhi-based research and advocacy organisation, has found very high levels of pesticide residues in human blood samples taken from Punjab villages. The study conducted by the Centre’s Pollution Monitoring Laboratory appears in the fortnightly newsmagazine Down To Earth (June 15, 2005).

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