Story | Centre for Science and Environment

Story


Decentralised Waste Water Treatment

The water and sewage management in cities will determine the growth of cities in India. Most cities are today water stressed, unable to cope with the water demand of the growing urban populations and to treat the resulting wastewater. Cities are continually coping with different forms of crises – water scarcity in summer, floods in monsoons and water pollution throughout the year.

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Rain Water Harvesting

Centre for Science and Environment has been working on promotion of the concept of water harvesting for more than a decade now. CSE started its campaign with the research on traditional systems of water harvesting systems existing across the country. The research was followed by the publication of the book, Dying Wisdom: Rise, Fall and Potential of India’s Traditional Water Harvesting Systems.

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River Pollution

With growing urbanisation and industralisation India faces the challenge of providing clean and safe drinking water to all citizens. In the name of economic growth most rivers and streams are turning into sewers. As more and more rivers are getting polluted, the municipalities are finding it difficult to treat river water to safe levels and supply it to citizens.
Visit River Pollution section

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Toys

Press Release
January 15, 2010
The trouble with toys…
Latest CSE study finds high levels of toxic phthalates in children’s toys in India

Read more...

Lab Report
:: Phthalates in Toys
:: Details of the samples of toys tested
   by CSE

Fact Sheet
:: Regulations
:: Health Implications

Presantation
:: Toxic Toys

DTE Cover story

Hand to mouth
Read more...

Equitywatch

CSE takes on climate change
Read more

equitywatch

Toxic toys

We generally take toys for granted but this may no longer be the case atleast not if we are concerned about the health of our young children.

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Front Page Teaser: 

We generally take toys for granted but this may no longer be the case atleast not if we are concerned about the health of our young children.

Move over boys and girls, the men are here: the future of climate negotiations and why India wants the Accord

Somebody recently asked me why India supported the Copenhagen Accord. It is correct to say that the proposed accord has no meaningful targets for emission reduction from Annex 1 (industrialized countries). Global emissions will increase or reduce at best marginally.

Question and answer

Blogs
The paranoia of pedestrian(s)
Aug 29, 2012
A reflection on 'walkability' in South Asia
By: Papia Samajdar
A 'kurz' overview
CSE Fellowship Media Briefing on 'Backs to the wall: Tigers, tiger habitats and conservation'
By: Papia Samajdar

India should not support the Copenhagen Accord, says CSE

New Delhi, January 8, 2010: India should not sign and endorse the Copenhagen Agreement, says CSE. The Accord is an extremely weak document, which deliberately forgives industrialised countries’ historical responsibility for climate change and worse, is designed for meaningless and ineffective action to curb global warming.

Community Water Pollution Monitoring Programme

On October 1, 2008, Pali - a textile town in Rajasthan near Jodhpur - witnessed a unique jan sabha (public meeting) wherein the farmers, industry and the government sat together to discuss the solutions to deal with a long pending issue of pollution in the rivers Bandi and Luni.

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