Water Management | Centre for Science and Environment

Water Management


Churning still water: Round table for finalisation of draft framework legislation for the protection and conservation of waterbodies in South Asia

Surface water sources such as lakes, ponds and rivers are very important as they help in flood control, ground water  recharge and storm protection. They also secure water for drinking, agriculture and industrial purposes. They play an important role in mitigating and adapting to the climate change effects. Once, lakes and wetlands played a vital role in South Asia’s urban landscape, but rapid urbanisation in the region has led to massive encroachment and pollution of its waterbodies.

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 Date: 17-18 December, 2013

Water Management

The water and sewage management in cities will determine the growth of cities in India. Most cities are today water stressed, unable to cope with the water demand of the growing urban populations and to treat the resulting wastewater. Cities are continually coping with different forms of crises – water scarcity in summer, floods in monsoons and water pollution throughout the year.

Decentralised Waste Water Treatment

The water and sewage management in cities will determine the growth of cities in India. Most cities are today water stressed, unable to cope with the water demand of the growing urban populations and to treat the resulting wastewater. Cities are continually coping with different forms of crises – water scarcity in summer, floods in monsoons and water pollution throughout the year.

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Rain Water Harvesting

Centre for Science and Environment has been working on promotion of the concept of water harvesting for more than a decade now. CSE started its campaign with the research on traditional systems of water harvesting systems existing across the country. The research was followed by the publication of the book, Dying Wisdom: Rise, Fall and Potential of India’s Traditional Water Harvesting Systems.

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River Pollution

With growing urbanisation and industralisation India faces the challenge of providing clean and safe drinking water to all citizens. In the name of economic growth most rivers and streams are turning into sewers. As more and more rivers are getting polluted, the municipalities are finding it difficult to treat river water to safe levels and supply it to citizens.
Visit River Pollution section

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Work Overview: Water Management

The fundamental principle underlying CSE’s water management programme is that the looming water crisis facing the country is not primarily due to a lack of water, but rather arises from mismanagement of water resources. The centralized management paradigm has kept the citizens out and taken away their sense of responsibility towards managing their water.

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