Tech-transfer finds consensus on all but IPR issue | Centre for Science and Environment


Tech-transfer finds consensus on all but IPR issue

Text to be presented to high level ministerial segment could be the first positive outcome at Cancun  

By Arnan Pratim Dutta

Cancun: A semblance of agreement on the crucial element of technology transfer may emerge as the first positive outcome at Cancun on the 10th day when a rather diluted text on the matter is handed over to the high level segment, where ministers get involved in negotiations.

The technology transfer issue draft text was developed in the long term commitment action (LCA) in the ongoing climate change meet in Canucn and it the first document to have emerged from the climate negotiations this year. However, the contentious matter of transfer of patented technology has not been resolved and will be discussed in next year's CoP at Durban, South Africa.

According to negotiators involved in the process, some elements of the tech transfer deal, such as the Technology Executive Committee (TEC), a technology technology centre along with a network of nodes (branches) has found consensus among all the parties.

India played the anchor in getting the first set of agreement on technology. The profile and the framework for setting up of these centres have been agreed upon. The TEC will prepare the terms of reference for the technological innovation centers and the network and monitor the technology technology centres and report directly to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change. The climate technology centre will control the regional nodes spread all over the world which would help, find and develop innovations and technologies as well help procure finances that would reduce emissions.

The new mechanism would however be a compromise between the developed world, particularly the US and the developing countries. The US has maintained that IPR on green technology would be offered to developing nations at the market price. The developing countries especially Bolivia and Ecuador had countered the US proposal by saying that the developed countries should transfer green solutions at a no cost, emerging technologies be financed with money from the rich nations. Both the US and EU stoically opposed any mention of issues related to IPR, saying all IPR related matters will be tackled in 2011.
 
 
 

CoP19
CoP19/Warsaw
CoP18
Doha, Qatar
CoP9
Milan, Italy
CoP17
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CoP8
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CoP16
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Arjuna Srinidhi
Email: arjuna@cseindia.org
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