Nutrition | Centre for Science and Environment

Nutrition


Delhi High Court asks for detailed response on the case on banning junk food in schools

  • Court wants to know which junk foods should be regulated. Fixes next hearing for August 6, 2014.
  • CSE welcomes the court’s directive in the 2010 PIL filed by Uday Foundation.
  • CSE has pointed out that the recent junk food-related guidelines submitted by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India to the court are ineffective in addressing the prayers of the PIL; says the food industry has managed to dilute the guidelines.

Junk games and schoolchildren

 “There is nothing called junk food. The problem with obesity lies with children who do not exercise enough. What is needed is for them to run and jump, and to do this they need to consume high-calorie food. So, food high in salt, sugar and fat is good for them.” This is what was argued vehemently and rudely by representatives of the food industry in the committee, set up under directions from the Delhi High Court to frame guidelines for junk food in the country.

What it takes to deliver midday meal

 The tragic loss of 23 young lives because of contaminated food in a Bihar school is unacceptable. But it is also a fact that the Mid Day Meal Scheme, under which cooked food is compulsorily provided to children in government schools, is too important and critical to give up on. The only questions that matter are: why does the scheme not work as well as it should and what can be done to fix it?

More to junk food than meets the eye

Junk food is junk by its very definition. But how bad is it and what is it that companies do not tell people about this food? This is what the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) laboratory checked. The results were both predictable and alarming. What was equally predictable was the response of big food companies and their spokespersons—denials and dismissals. But they are missing the point.

Control your food. It is your business

Our control over our food and our health requires inventive institutional reordering and new ideas about the way food regulations work.

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