CSE | Centre for Science and Environment

CSE


Pesticide regulations

Pesticides are widely used in agriculture without paying much heed to the consequences of its unregulated and indiscriminate use . This fact has been known to our policy makers for nearly five decades. The government is atleast under law supposed to regulate its use. The Insecticides Act of 1971 is a key piece of legislation that is supposed to govern the use, manufacture, distribution, sale and transport of insecticides with a view to lowering risks to human and animal health. In practice this is rarely the case as the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) discovered nearly a decade ago.

Trans fat in oils

Oil is essential for our body to function. But that does not mean that we should take for granted the cooking mediums we use in our food. As the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) laboratory report recently discovered our branded edible oils are full of unhealthy trans fats. The results showed trans fats in seven leading vanaspati brands were five to 12 times the 2 per cent standard set by Denmark. Trans fats are formed during the process of addition of hydrogen atoms to oils, a process industry prefers as it keeps the oil from turning rancid and ensures a longer shelf life.

Mercury: Heavy Toxin

Mercury is a very toxic and dangerous substance. It is  poisonous in all forms - inorganic, organic or elemental. Mercury is a proven neurotoxin. Inhaling mercury vapours can severely damage the respiratory tract. Sore throat, coughing, pain or tightness in the chest, headache, muscle weakness, anorexia, gastrointestinal disturbance, fever, bronchitis and pneumonitis are symptoms of mercury toxicity. Health concerns should be reason enough for us to properly manage its imports and disposal. On the contrary, mercury has come to severely contaminate land, water, air and the food chain throughout India.

Wastewater recycling

The wastewater recycling system at CSE has been designed to treat 8000 litres per day based on the assumption that at any given moment at least a 100 persons would be ocupying the premises. The components involved in treatment are a settler, a baffled reactor and a planted filter.

The treated wastewater is stored in an underground sump. This water is used for gardening.

Environmentalists fighting to save the Ousteri lake

Ousteri lake (Osudu lake) is one of the examples in the history of deterioration of wetlands where a long wait for the final judgment is taking the lake towards a slow death process.

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Presentations March 5, 2010

National Research Conference on Climate Change

 


 

National Research Conference on Climate Change

Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), Indian Institute of Technology Madras (IITM), and the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) organized the National Research Conference on Climate Change at IITD on March 5 and 6, 2010.  

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Front Page Teaser: 

Date: March 5 and 6, 2010

Organized jointly by IIT Delhi, IIT Madras, and Centre for Science and Environment.

Catching water where it falls

water pic

Background

The total area of the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) building is 1,000 sq. m. The office gets most of its water supply from groundwater through its borewell. The rainwaterwater harvesting system was installed in the building in June 1999.


Rainwater available for harvesting

Average annual rainfall in Delhi - 611 mm (24 inches).

Solar energy

CSE solar panels

The hybrid solar power system in the Centre for Science and Environment acts as an on-line uninterrupted power supply (UPS) system, providing stable power to all the electronic appliances.

120 solar modules are mounted on a space frame over the front twin-pillar supported pergola of the CSE building. The remaining 20 are installed over the CSE canteen roof.

 Components

A village crippled by fluorosis

Government offers Rs 25,000 each to 109 BPL families to relocate; villagers turn down the offer

by Ashutosh Mishra, Khurda

Pabani Pradhan, 42, looks 60. She can’t walk on her own. Joginath Pradhan, 60, Pabani’s neighbour, uses crutches. Sukant, 24, the sole breadwinner of a family of six, cannot move out of the village to fit tiles in people’s houses any more because his body has become stiff. Fluorosis has crippled them, and other residents of Balsingh-Singpur in Khurda district of Orissa.

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