CSE | Centre for Science and Environment


Catching water where it falls

water pic


The total area of the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) building is 1,000 sq. m. The office gets most of its water supply from groundwater through its borewell. The rainwaterwater harvesting system was installed in the building in June 1999.

Rainwater available for harvesting

Average annual rainfall in Delhi - 611 mm (24 inches).

Solar energy

CSE solar panels

The hybrid solar power system in the Centre for Science and Environment acts as an on-line uninterrupted power supply (UPS) system, providing stable power to all the electronic appliances.

120 solar modules are mounted on a space frame over the front twin-pillar supported pergola of the CSE building. The remaining 20 are installed over the CSE canteen roof.


A village crippled by fluorosis

Government offers Rs 25,000 each to 109 BPL families to relocate; villagers turn down the offer

by Ashutosh Mishra, Khurda

Pabani Pradhan, 42, looks 60. She can’t walk on her own. Joginath Pradhan, 60, Pabani’s neighbour, uses crutches. Sukant, 24, the sole breadwinner of a family of six, cannot move out of the village to fit tiles in people’s houses any more because his body has become stiff. Fluorosis has crippled them, and other residents of Balsingh-Singpur in Khurda district of Orissa.

Intrepid non learners

Indian politicians travel on public money – for what they can learn from the click of a mouse

by Mathew Thomas, Bangalore Citizen’s Action Forum

Gobar Times Green Schools Programme takes a global leap

With an eventful and exciting three-year stint behind it, GTGSP is racing ahead in its fourth lap in India - but its sights are no longer confined within the country. In 2009, EEU entered the international arena, forging partnerships with governments and other global agencies in a bid to reach out to a wider and more diverse community of people.


Little boxes of herbs

A 125 year old shop sells herbal medicines in the lanes of Chennai

by Sumana Narayanan

A month ago I found myself dodging traffic in one of Chennai’s older areas, Mylapore. I was on an errand to buy a herbal medicine for a cousin. The shop I was looking for is well-known but hard to locate.

Dont just count trees

Quality of forests is as important as tree cover

by B K P Sinha, former principal conservator of forests, Uttar Pradesh

Low pulse

Spiralling prices of pulses have shown India’s dependence on imports. Pulses are integral to  India’s diet but not its food policy. As a result, supply cannot meet demand. What are the consequences and  solutions?

by Savvy Soumya Mishra

The tourist does leave a footprint

But eco-tourism could still be people friendly

by Neelambry Phalkey and Seema Purushothaman, Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and Environment, Bengaluru

The holiday season is just over. Many of us would have encountered advertisements with words like “eco hotel” and “eco tours” to lure us to experience “nature’s lap” or “wilderness”. You might think such businesses are nature friendly. But they could turn out to be quite the contrary.


Electric and hybrid vehicles are gaining a foothold because they are cheap and clean. But batteries are either expensive or short-lived. Their future rests with industry’s innovation and government’s support.

by Vivek Chattopadhyaya

The glitz and glamour at the biggest auto show in Delhi drew the highest number of footfalls ever. The show unveiled dreams and many of them had a green wrap this time. Amid the slew of small cars at the expo, held on January 5-11, was a line-up of electric and hybrid vehicles.

Follow us on

gobar times