Climate Change | Centre for Science and Environment

Climate Change


Cloud view clears up

By: Smriti Sharma

Origin of aerosols dictates cloud shape

How cloudy is it outside? The answers may depend on the level of atmospheric pollution in one’s region. Cloud-forming microscopic particles, called aerosols, absorb and reflect solar radiation. These particles have the ability to modify cloud formation and encourage or suppress precipitation. They can be released from manmade sources like vehicles, industry, agriculture, and natural sources like sea salt, volcanic dust, sulphates from biogenic gases.

ABCDE of Obama’s sales pitch

There is no doubt US President Barack Obama was in India on a business trip. His recent electoral losses weighed heavily with him when he stitched up deals, reportedly worth US $10 billion, that would create about 50,000 jobs back home.

How climate ready are we?

On a brief visit to Pakistan this week I noted that the recent floods have left deep impressions on the country’s policy and political leadership. They spoke about the scale of devastation, human suffering and the massive challenge of rehabilitation. They also noted, interestingly, that in their view there was a link to climate change.

Press Note: How emissions-intensive are our industries?

 
How emissions-intensive are our industries?

A note on CSE’s latest report, Challenge of the New Balance

cover_5_0.jpg
Front Page Teaser: 

June 1, 2010
Joint meeting organized by IIT-Bombay and CSE.

Challenge of the New Balance

CSE's landmark study on how India will reduce emissions to combat climate change.

In 2009, CSE began analysing the six most emissions-intensive industrial sectors to find out how Indian industry performs – and will perform in future - in terms of reduction in emissions. These sectors – power, steel, cement, aluminium, paper and pulp and fertilizers - together accounted for over 60 per cent of India’s CO2 emissions in 2008-09.

cover_5.jpg

No cheap change is possible

Last fortnight I asked: is India rich enough to pay for the cost of transition to a low-carbon economy? I put the question in the context of current moves in climate change negotiations which demand countries such as India—till now seen as victims of the carbon excesses of the already industrialized world—must now take full responsibility to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The US-sponsored and India-supported Copenhagen Accord rejects the principle of historical responsibility towards climate change, radically changing the global framework of action for ever more.

All is not well: climate negotiations in a new avatar

Climate change negotiations—cold after the freeze at Copenhagen—have warmed up again. In early April, negotiators met in Bonn, Germany, on the possible agreement that could be signed at the meet scheduled in December 2010 in Mexico. This was followed by a US-convened meet of the Major Economies Forum, better named the major emitters forum, in Washington. Next weekend, the group calling itself BASIC—China, Brazil, South Africa and India—is meeting in Cape Town to come up with its common position on negotiations.

Press Release: How emissions-intensive are our industries?

 

cover.jpg
Front Page Teaser: 

April 27, 2010

  • Can India meet the emissions target set by government for 2020?
  • What are the implications for a climate constrained future?
Follow us on 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
gobar times