Climate Mitigation | Centre for Science and Environment

Climate Mitigation


A monsoon warning

As I write this my city Delhi is drowning. It started raining early this morning and within a few hours the city has come to a standstill. The television is showing scenes of traffic snarled up for hours, roads waterlogged and people and vehicles sunk deep in water and muck. The meteorological department records that some 60 mm of rain has fallen in just about 6 hours; 90 mm in 24 hours; and with this the city has made up for its deficit of rainfall this season. In other words, in just about 24 hours Delhi and its surrounding areas got half as much rain as they would in the entire month of September. Delhi, like all growing cities of India, is mindless about drainage. Storm water drains are either clogged or do not exist. Our lakes and ponds have been eaten away by real estate. Land is what the city values, not water. So when it rains more than it should the city drowns.

2010 top news on the environment in Asia

Date: Dec 2010

Top News is a compilation of important environmental news topics selected by environmental experts from the Asia-Pacific region as well as by international organisations and research institutes from twenty-one countries in the region.

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Here comes the sun

By: Mahazareen Dastur

The German experience is a good example for India’s solar energy mission

Deal won, stakes lost

Last fortnight we discussed the clandestine endgame afoot at Cancun to change the framework of the climate change negotiations to suit big and powerful polluters. Since then Cancun has concluded and a deal, in the form of a spate of agreements, has been gavelled into existence by the chair. Commentators and climate activists in the Western world are ecstatic. Even the critics say pragmatism has worked and the world has taken a small step ahead in its battle to fight emissions that determine its growth.

Press Note: How emissions-intensive are our industries?

 
How emissions-intensive are our industries?

A note on CSE’s latest report, Challenge of the New Balance

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Front Page Teaser: 

June 1, 2010
Joint meeting organized by IIT-Bombay and CSE.

No cheap change is possible

Last fortnight I asked: is India rich enough to pay for the cost of transition to a low-carbon economy? I put the question in the context of current moves in climate change negotiations which demand countries such as India—till now seen as victims of the carbon excesses of the already industrialized world—must now take full responsibility to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The US-sponsored and India-supported Copenhagen Accord rejects the principle of historical responsibility towards climate change, radically changing the global framework of action for ever more.

Challenge of the New Balance

This book is based on a study of the six most energy/emissions-intensive sectors of India, with the aim of determining India's low carbon growth options. The sectors covered are power, steel, aluminium, cement, fertilisers and paper and pulp. Together, these six sectors account for an estimated 61.5 per cent of the total greenhouse gas emissions in India (excluding emissions from agriculture and waste)…
 
Price Rs 690 (USD 39)
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