Health Effects | Centre for Science and Environment

Health Effects


Sin tax for redemption

The Goods and Services Tax of 40 per cent on “sugar-sweetened aerated and flavoured water” has a big bang impact on public health

2016: a year of growing dissent

This year, more than ever before, has been tumultuous, both in terms of economic politics and nature’s art

2016: a year of growing dissent

This year, more than ever before, has been tumultuous, both in terms economic politics and nature’s art

Who is cooking our recipe books?

A subtle marketing drive is changing our food habits and we do not even know it

Wheels are turning

Let’s share cars; take a bus or metro; cycle or walk

Early this month, I was in the Delhi High Court, where a battery of lawyers had filed separate petitions against the odd-even scheme of the Delhi government. This is a scheme to ration car usage so that in the critically polluted winter months only half the vehicles are on the road. Their arguments were that the scheme had led to enormous inconvenience and worse, daily pollution data showed no impact on air quality. Cars, they said, were not responsible for pollution. 

Food for nutrition, nature and livelihood

What societies eat reflects their position on the modernity trajectory. Poorer countries have health problems because of lack of food. Then as people get rich, they end up losing the health advantage of food availability. They eat processed food that is high in salt, sugar and fat, which make them obese and ill. It is only when societies get very rich that they rediscover the benefits of eating real food and value sustainability.

CSE welcomes Delhi High Court order on junk food

  • Delhi High Court orders to regulate junk food consumption among school children across India. Asks the food authority to enforce its guidelines on wholesome and nutritious foods

Straw in the wind

What does the decision to save groundwater in Punjab or Haryana have to do with air pollution in Delhi? Plenty. We need to know this because many actions have unintended and deadly consequences.

Walk the talk on carbon tax, Mr Finance Minister

Budget 2015, presented by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, has a first. In it, India has accepted that it has a de-facto carbon tax—on petroleum products and dirty coal. Arguably, the only big green initiative of this budget is the increase of cess on coal—from Rs 100 per tonne to Rs 200 per tonne. But the question is: is this carbon tax, imposed on the carbon content of fuel, doing what it should—reduce greenhouse gas emissions that are responsible for climate change?

So that we can breathe easy

THE EASIEST way to clear air pollution is to not know how bad it is. This is what India practices—in most parts of the country. There is virtually no equipment to monitor the air we breathe and no system that tells us what we should do when pollution levels are up and unhealthy.

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