Filter by Dates

 

Filter by Content Types

Air Quality And Public Health

Perception survey: Outdoor air pollution and its impact on our health

The latest Global Burden of Disease report, a global initiative involving a network of international health bodies and the World Health Organisation has shown outdoor air pollution as one of the top 10 killers in the world. In South Asia including India, it is ranked as the sixth most dangerous killer, -- three places behind indoor air pollution, which is the second highest killer in the region. Air pollution makes everyone, the rich and the poor, equally vulnerable.

The dawn of pollution

Health enthusiasts living near freeways should minimize their outdoor exercise timings during the early morning hours; they should also keep their windows closed through the night.

Orientation Programme on Urban Transportation Reforms for Liveable Cities

The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) is organising a three-day orientation programme, ’Urban Transportation Reforms for Liveable Cities,’ in New Delhi from November 21 – 23, 2012 for policy makers from different cities of India and South Asia. The objective of this forum is to promote good regulatory practices in air quality and mobility management. Many Indian and South Asian cities have already begun to develop action plans in response to the national air quality management policies and urban transport policies to achieve clean air and sustainable mobility.

Briefing Note: Dialogue Air Pollution and Our Health

August 31, 2011   Gulmohar Hall, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi Centre for Science and Environment joined hands with Indian Council for Medical Research and Indian Medical Association to organize a dialogue with the noted doctors – (respiratory physicians, cardiologists, pediatricians, oncologists), the air quality regulators, and health experts to track the newer concerns over health risks of polluted air.

Making space for emissions

What does the ubiquitous auto-rickshaw and the plush aeroplane have in common, other than getting us from one place to another? The auto-rickshaw, as India’s largest manufacturer Rahul Bajaj will tell you, is the symbol of democratic mobility — it provides transport for large numbers of people at what he says is affordable costs. But these vehicles are technology poor, and extremely polluting.

Planning in the air

India has added two more swanky symbols to bolster its first-world ambitions: the Rajiv Gandhi international airport in Hyderabad and the gleaming Bengaluru international airport in our software capital. But look beneath this glitzy façade and you will find another instance of development on the cheap. We refuse to admit that our dream of world-class infrastructure is not grounded on the hard reality that we are a rich and poor country at the same time. As a result, we do not think differently and plan for solutions that suit our needs.