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Green Rating Project

CSE unveils results of the 2nd Green Rating of the Pulp and paper industry

September 30, 2004  Pulp and paper industry rated for the second time by CSE. The rating pushes companies to improve their environmental performance The second rating of the pulp and paper sector shows visible improvements in environmental performance of large companies. CSE’s data shows that industry can work to provide jobs and a growth model -- it can provide employment to 0.55 million farming families just from tree plantation, and can make India a pulp-surplus country. The credibility of the rating works as a reputational incentive to drive change in the sector.

Cement industry 'green' only when it suits its pocket, says CSE rating study

New Delhi, December 16, 2005: The cement industry, the country’s second largest excise duty payer (after tobacco industry) and potentially very polluting, has been awarded the Three Leaves Award by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE). This sector, which has major environmental impacts, has received higher marks than the three sectors rated previously by CSE – pulp and paper, chlor-alkali and automobiles.

CFL is a leapfrog option for India as it increases efficiency, but the lack of regulations is jeopardising the programme

New Delhi, February 4, 2009: The burgeoning compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) sector in India is faced with some key concerns, and the most critical of them is the problem of disposal of mercury used in CFLs: this was the consensus at a Round Table meeting on the sector, organised here today by the New Delhi-based research and advocacy organisation, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE).

About Green Rating Programme

The Green Rating Project (GRP) is an effort to rate industrial units within a specific sector on the basis of their environment friendliness. The project aims at encouraging companies to adopt better environment management policies. Environment risk liability is an issue that is gaining increasing attention in Indian company’s boardroom. Reasons for pro-activeness: International financial institutions and investors are keen to know more about the potential liability they could be involved in by investing in emerging markets like India, which lacks in environmental commitments. Investors associate poor social and environmental performance with financial risks and liabilities.