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We can

It is time we talked about the real cost of our food, about how to benefit the farmers who grow our food

Wolf at our door

The US has made the world rewrite the climate agreement so that the targets are based on voluntary action, not science

Promise me the monsoon

Why this weird weather? Why have western disturbances—the extra-tropical storms that originate in the Mediterranean and Atlantic seas—been lashing us again and again, with devastating impacts on agriculture? Is this normal? Or has weird weather become the new definition of normal?

Change of climate in the US

Climate change has a surprising new follower: the US president. The US government has been the biggest bugbear in climate change negotiations. Since discussions began on this issue in the early 1990s, the US has stymied all efforts for an effective and fair deal. It has blocked action by arguing that countries like China and India must first do more. Worse, successive governments have even denied that the threat from a changing climate is real, let alone urgent.

Climate science in real world

What we desperately shut our minds to is once again being pronounced ever more clearly: climate change is here; it is already bringing devastating extreme weather events; it will become worse in the years to come. In late September, part 1 of the fifth assessment report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was released in Stockholm.

Weather dice is loaded

During my weekly conversation with my sister I told her about the unusual searing heat this June, the problems of power cuts and how we are coping in India. She, in turn, told me that in Washington DC, where she lives, there was a terrible storm that damaged her roof and uprooted trees in her garden. They were fortunate that they still had electricity, because most houses in the city were in the dark. She also said it was unbearably hot because the region was in the grip of an unprecedented heat wave.

Living with changing climate: CSE Study

Impact, vulnerability and adaptation challenges in Indian Sundarbans For residents of Indian Sundarbans, climate change is now a part of their daily survival battles. While the global negotiations towards mitigation of climate change have remained inconclusive over the years, sea level rise, cyclones, rainfall patterns have kept changing for the worse. Life is much more difficult now and development of the area more expensive.