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Opening speech of Sunita Narain at Global Conference on Coal

Sunita Narain talks about India's energy security and coal consumption at the International Conference on Coal Based Power called Confronting Environmental Challenges, organised by the Centre for Science and Environment between March 17-19 in Delhi India.

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Indonesia's Coal Power Emission Norms: Lessons from India and China

Coal is the mainstay of the global electricity supply, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the world’s total. Despite recent growth of renewable energy in major economies, coal continues to be the leading contributor due to its wide availability and the competitive price of coal-based electricity generation.

Wolf at our door

The US has made the world rewrite the climate agreement so that the targets are based on voluntary action, not science

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District Mineral Foundation (DMF) 2017

Instituted in March 2015 under India’s central mining law, the Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act (1957), District Mineral Foundation (DMF) 

Wheels are turning

Let’s share cars; take a bus or metro; cycle or walk Early this month, I was in the Delhi High Court, where a battery of lawyers had filed separate petitions against the odd-even scheme of the Delhi government. This is a scheme to ration car usage so that in the critically polluted winter months only half the vehicles are on the road. Their arguments were that the scheme had led to enormous inconvenience and worse, daily pollution data showed no impact on air quality. Cars, they said, were not responsible for pollution. 

Walk the talk on carbon tax, Mr Finance Minister

Budget 2015, presented by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, has a first. In it, India has accepted that it has a de-facto carbon tax—on petroleum products and dirty coal. Arguably, the only big green initiative of this budget is the increase of cess on coal—from Rs 100 per tonne to Rs 200 per tonne. But the question is: is this carbon tax, imposed on the carbon content of fuel, doing what it should—reduce greenhouse gas emissions that are responsible for climate change?

How power can be cleaned

Coal is an environmentalist’s bugbear. The use of coal to generate energy is the key reason the world is looking at a catastrophic future because of climate change. Recognising this, global civil society has given a rousing call for coal divestment, asking companies, universities and individuals to stop investment in coal thermal power plants. They want coal to go, renewables to be in. And in the interim, clean gas, also a fossil fuel, to be used as a “bridge fuel”. In this scenario any talk of “cleaning” coal to make it less damaging is untenable.

Coal politics in an unequal world

Australia is a coal country. It is big business—miners are important in politics and black gold exports dominate the country’s finances. But dirty and polluting coal evokes emotions in environmentally concerned people. Coal-based power provides 40 per cent of the world’s electricity and emits one-third of global carbon dioxide, which is pushing the world to climate change.