The School of Water and Waste (SW&W)

CSE has played a significant role in highlighting issues around Water, especially in creating awareness for an urgent need to address citywide sanitation and effective Faecal Sludge and Septage Management (FSSM). For instance, in 2011 CSE developed a policy paper on Septage Management in India which influenced the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs (MoHUA) to issue an Advisory Note on SeptageManagement in 2013,

WORK OVERVIEW

Urban India is drowning under a sea of waste. Every year, it produces 62 million tonnes (MT) of municipal solid waste (MSW), 31 MT of which is dumped on to landfill sites. Most of these sites are overflowing their capacity and polluting the surrounding land, groundwater and air. Cities are now running out of land on which to dump their waste and have begun throwing it in the ‘backyards’ of smaller towns, suburbs and villages, leading to conflicts. Looking for or creating more landfills as a solution to the waste problem, thus, is no longer an option.

University Programme

Environment is central to the idea of sustainable and inclusive development. And so is the need for effective dissemination of environmental knowledge in our educational institutions both at school as and at university levels.

The right of the people of the mining-affected areas to benefit from the mineral-rich lands they live on

The lopsided equation of poverty and social benefits have ailed some of India's richest mining districts for decades. Mining has benefitted mining companies, individual miners and governments, not the communities living there. After years of deliberations and negotiations in 2015, the country's central mining law, the the Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act (MMDR) of 1957 was amended and District Mineral Foundation (DMF) was instituted. The DMF is a non-profit statutory 'Trust' for every Indian district affected by mining-related operations, which should "work for the interest and benefit of persons, and areas affected by mining-related operations".

The right of the people of the mining-affected areas to benefit from the mineral-rich lands they live on

The lopsided equation of poverty and social benefits have ailed some of India's richest mining districts for decades. Mining has benefitted mining companies, individual miners and governments, not the communities living there. After years of deliberations and negotiations in 2015, the country's central mining law, the the Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act (MMDR) of 1957 was amended and District Mineral Foundation (DMF) was instituted. The DMF is a non-profit statutory 'Trust' for every Indian district affected by mining-related operations, which should "work for the interest and benefit of persons, and areas affected by mining-related operations".

WHAT IS CEMS?

Continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) and continuous effluent quality monitoring system (CEQMS) are real-time air and water pollution monitoring systems respectively. Continuous ambient air quality monitoring system (CAAQMS) is used for monitoring ambient air quality on real- time basis. A continuous monitoring system is comprised of sampling, conditioning, and analytical components and software designed to provide direct, real- time, continuous measurements of pollution by analyzing representative sample(s) of air and water to be monitored.

University Programme: An Overview

Introduction/ Background: Environment is central to the idea of sustainable and inclusive development. And so is the need for effective dissemination of environmental knowledge in our educational institutions both at school as and at university levels.

About Environment Education

Environment education has for long been limited to a narrow focus on nature and wildlife, topics on which a vast amount of literature already exists. The Environment Education Unit (EEU) at CSE was launched to initiate ecological literacy.

Work Overview - Energy

India faces a huge energy deficit, with millions of households without power for basic lighting or cooking, and coal power is essential for the next few decades to resolve this energy crisis, to address the issue of energy access, which is just as important as the environmental problems of unclean power.

Work Overview

Mobility Crisis The biggest challenge that confronts cities today is the intractable problem of automobile dependence. As the automobile dependence continues to grow, it is adversely affecting the quality of urban life. Congestion, unsafe roads and pollution remain their bane. Unless accompanied by policies to restrict the growth in car and motorised two-wheeler travel, cities will run hard only to stand still.